Marrakesch. Esther Freud

ISBN: 9783548602974

Published:

Paperback

256 pages


Description

Marrakesch.  by  Esther Freud

Marrakesch. by Esther Freud
| Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, audiobook, mp3, RTF | 256 pages | ISBN: 9783548602974 | 10.12 Mb

Ein Sommer in Marokko - für die siebenjährige Bea und ihre fünfjährige Schwester nichts als ein schönes Ferienerlebnis. Vorerst, denn es sind die frühen siebziger Jahre und Beas Mutter sucht etwas ganz anderes in der Fremde: Freiheit und Liebe. EinesMoreEin Sommer in Marokko - für die siebenjährige Bea und ihre fünfjährige Schwester nichts als ein schönes Ferienerlebnis. Vorerst, denn es sind die frühen siebziger Jahre und Beas Mutter sucht etwas ganz anderes in der Fremde: Freiheit und Liebe. Eines Tages tritt Bilal, Freund, Liebhaber und marokkanischer Weggefährte, in ihr Leben und plötzlich bekommt die Zeit in Marokko ein völlig neues Gesicht ...------------Hideous Kinky begins as a small, cheerful autobiographical novel following Thurbers variation on Wordsworth: Humor is emotional chaos recollected in tranquillity.

In the mid-1960s, two girls, ages 5 and 7, travel with their mother from London to Marrakech. Also along for the ride are John, Mums boyfriend, and Maretta, Johns wife. Though the author is a descendant of Sigmund Freud, the title of her first book has little to do with the pleasure principle. Instead, it is the only phrase the sisters have heard Maretta speak, one that quickly becomes an all-purpose epithet: One of the shepherds whistled and the dogs slung to the ground.

Bea raised an eyebrow as she passed me. Hideous kinky, she whispered. Esther Freuds vocabulary and tone veer easily from the childlike to the more sophisticated, particularly when she recounts speech or circumstances beyond a childs comprehension. Once the group arrives in Marrakech, John and Maretta split off, and Mum hooks up with various men and pursues spirituality. The children, meanwhile, want nothing more than to be normal--or at least not to be so embarrassed by their mothers Islamic fervor: Oh Mum, please...

I was prepared to beg. Please dont be a Sufi. In Hideous Kinky, people appear and disappear with little reason or explanation. Though most of the characters are differentiated by one outstanding feature, Bilal, the itinerant builder and magicians apprentice who becomes one of Mums lovers, is more complex.

The narrator loves and trusts him from the start, and when she asks him if he will eventually return to England with them, Bilal closed his eyes and began to hum along with Om Kalsoum, whose voice crackled and wept through a radio in the back of the café.Hideous Kinky is curiously divided. The first half is a lark. The girls explore Marrakech, picking up the language and even passing themselves off as beggars. The familys only worries are about money, and these are soon cured by the next bank draft from their father.

But the second half is more melancholy. Mums religious zeal becomes rather less endearing, and as the girls adventures turn more dangerous, local rituals and customs begin to lose their charm: I didnt like to think about the camel festival. The camel, garlanded in flowers, collected us from our house in the Mellah, and we had followed it out of the city and high into the mountains in a procession of singing. The parade ends, however, with the animals beheading.

Occasionally I looked at Bea to see if she was running over these events like I was, the sound effects living their own life behind her eyes, but she gave nothing away.In the end, Hideous Kinky is a novel less about an exotic country seen through an innocents eyes than about family, about having a deeply embarrassing mother, an older sister who does everything before you, and a distant father. It escapes sentimentality through simplicity: Bilal was my Dad.

No one denied it when I said so. The author, her sister, and her mother spent two years in Morocco, and while Esther Freud may not have invented her subject, she has re-created it with a light touch and delicate irony.



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